(Above) Chris Dean, American Love Monster, lenticular art print, edition of 40.
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(Above) Chris Dean, Vision Test, lenticular art print, edition of 40.
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(Above) Chris Dean, Your Crushing Defeat, lenticular art print, edition of 40.
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(Above) Chris Dean, 64 on The Floor, lenticular art print, edition of 40.
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(Above) Chris Dean, Gotta Do What You Can, lenticular art print, edition of 40.
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(Above) Chris Dean, Illiterate Spector of Mark Ryden’s Atari Childhood, lenticular art print, edition of 40. Click for larger view.
(Above) Chris Dean, Land of Milk and Honey Baked Ham, lenticular art print, edition of 40.
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(Above) Chris Dean, Kill Kwerty, lenticular art print, edition of 40.
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DO YOU REMEMBER LENTICULARS? THE FIRST ONE I REMEMBER SEEING was a Cracker Jack prize. It was usually simple things like a black and white image of a winking eye or a bucking bronco, but it was fun and always something I wanted to save. Over the years, I have seen lenticulars used on the cover of magazines, like special issues of TV Guide, National Geographic and Rolling Stone. Chris Dean, an artist who shows at TAG Art Gallery, is an artist that uses the lenticular printing process for his vibrant, pop culture inspired art. His work fits right in with the stylistic direction of many Los Angeles artists today—indeed Dean graduated from San Jose State University in 1994. His early work involved 3-D work with the need for special red & green glasses, but he has worked years to produce the lenticular process himself at his studio.

Apparently, Dean has had to deal with some criticism of his process, and he addresses that below:
“I have been excited to see the reactions of people to the work. It is “like fire,” one friend confessed. While I am happy to take appropriate credit for the reaction it is certainly one of the benefits in working with a medium that is by its nature so fun. That fact tends to polarize people however. Some see only a gimmick, and dismiss anything done with it as pop trash. It is hard to discount their experience, there certainly are plenty of examples of work whose only strength is the medium. The same thing is overwhelmingly true of holography. But that view can unfairly prejudice a viewer. It is really up to the artist, not the medium, to produce something of artistic value. Hopefully as more artists dig deeper into the medium the critics will be unable to make blanket judgments of that kind and there will be a change of attitude.

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